Making an Exit

Making an Exit

It was hard a decision to make. but once I had decided it was time to go from a job & Company that I fell for, to follow my own path that was more suitable for me and my career aspirations – I felt lighter, happier and energised.

The truth is, how you leave a company is just, actually, if not more important than how you enter the organisation. Yes, first impressions count but what about that lasting impression.

When you watch a film or TV programme you are gripped to how the story ended. Not necessarily how it began. Crappy endings mean bad reviews, no season renewals, no sequel and worst of all, placed in the crap pile! By the show of hands: Who wants to be in the crap pile? – that’s right, NO ONE!

My Partner, who is self-employed, has a bit of a motto: “You are only as good as your last job” and it is something that is not only quite fitting for this post, but actually rather a nice mantra to live by.

Here I tell my story of what I did in my final working days. If you are currently working your notice period, I hope this can help shape your exit strategy.

My last few weeks were tough, my brain had started to empty, I had even started to forget people’s names (OK, in my defence, they themselves had already left and I hadn’t seen them for a good few months)  and I was getting excited about my new adventure…

The plan was simple. Align expectations with my line manager, deliver on the items that were deemed critical and although tough, DO NOT get involved with the office politics!

I kept my line manager in the loop, offered any assistance with reviewing CVs or being part of the recruitment process (which wasn’t accepted or in fact really my place, but the offer was there) and made sure I was available for any handovers. The management role I held, meant that I was a resource on multiple projects that were at all different stages within a project life-cycle. Knowing this I did the following:

  • Two group drop-in sessions for Project Managers to come along to ensure that they had the up to date version of the process and had an opportunity to bring up any critical actions
  • 1-2-1 sessions with the individual Project Managers which gave them the opportunity to go into more specific detail and complete any relevant documentation
  • And finally, on this point – Each session was followed up with an email, copying in my team, my line manager and the managers of Project Managers.

Aside from the project work I was responsible for, I also had ownership with processes and some general administration. I made sure all artefacts I created were accessible and followed this up with an email. I also produced a basic handover document, which could be used as a base for a new starter – the document included the repository location, reporting details and conference ID. Although it seems simple, not everyone uses their initiative or bothers to spend the time.

As my last few days sailed by, I made sure the I’s are dotted and the T’s crossed. I made sure I swapped contact details with colleagues that I built great relationship with. I wasn’t very forthcoming with my next steps after I leave; some people like to announce their success however, it is also just fine to keep your cards close to your chest.

Departure day arrived, I sent a few emails then cleared my laptop down. After a farewell lunch, I did my rounds of goodbye, wishing people luck and success. I handed my equipment and building pass back to a trustworthy individual (my manager wasn’t in).

I gracefully stepped out the front door, where it only felt like the day before where the excitement all began.

CV No-Go Zones: Things to not include or do in your CV

CV No-Go Zones: Things to not include or do in your CV

The truth is, writing a CV is an art form. It can take many, many, many attempts before you have a coherent document, that recruiters run through a system to pick out key words before passing it on to the hiring manager. 

But once you have mastered your CV, wow! The sense of achievement feels fantastic! And this document (your CV) will get you through the rest of your career. 

It is always difficult to know where to start, but first, you need to know the No-Go Zones.

There are certain things that should not show up on a CV . In this piece I call out 10 areas that should never appear or be used in your CV:

1: Private and personal data. That is: your date of birth/age, gender, religious belief, national insurance number or sexual orientation. By including such information, you are opening yourself up to discrimination. And… never include your martial status. In fact, it’s now illegal to discuss a candidate’s marital status under the Equality Act in the UK. 

2: Inappropriate contact information, with this I mean your email. If your email is bossbabe27@emailprovider.com (or something far more unsavoury, and you know what I mean), which is fine to use to set up your social media, BUT not so fine for applying for a job. Get onto google and create a new FREE email: firstname.secondname@gmail.com – ✔ done.

3: Social media handles. Other than LinkedIn, there really is no need to include the others.

4: Every-single-damn-grade from any and every exam you have ever taken. After a few years your school grades become irrelevant. Especially if you’ve moved onto further education or have professional qualifications. The best way to include grades is to cover your most recent education first, such as professional qualifications. Then, move backwards including fewer details as you go. 

5: Colours and funky formats. Now, this is really depends on the job you apply for. In a creative world, sure – Why don’t you stand out but putting your CV in a different format. For example, if you are applying to Innocent Smoothies, turn your CV into a label on virtual 3D bottle! Not only will you stand out but you are also showing off your skills. But make sure you attach the PDF/Word document as well.  However, when I was talking to a recruitment friend of mine, she said how she wished that all candidates followed the black and white standard format, which makes it is easy for her (as recruitment consultant) to read. So don’t get rejected because you made your CV bright green.

6: Made up job titles. Another area my recruitment consultant friend mentioned, was how frustrating it can be when candidates make up their job roles, then when interviewing they realise, the candidate has not done the job before, or even have the skills and it wastes a lot of time.

7: Fake skills. Don’t get caught out on this one.

8: Your photo: I know in some countries its standard practice to include an up-to-date photograph of yourself on your CV/resume. However, in the UK, it’s one of a few personal details that you’re better off removing. not only does it take up valuable space and doesn’t add anything to show how well you perform. It can also open the recruiter up to unconscious bias.  

9: Poor language, spelling and grammar. This immediately shows laziness and can make you look incompetent. A way around this, is by creating your CV in MS Word: go to Review > Read Aloud. Utter game changer.

10: Hobbies and Interests. Unless you do something remarkable as a hobby then don’t bother including any. We all like to read, go the gym and cook. These hobbies are not going to make you standout.

Now you know what not to do, why don’t you come and checkout the CV Surgery to learn what to do.

You can opt in for either a group session or 1-2-1 coaching session, it really depends what you need!  To find out more, email me coaching@lucygrimwade.com

Or use the form below:

Self-employed continuity, ways to adapt your business

Self-employed continuity, ways to adapt your business

With the call for self-isolation (back in March 2020) and social distancing sweeping the nation (and the entire world) due to Coronavirus/Covid-19, corporations invoke a work from home policy to ensure business as (un)usual can carry on.

But what about the self-employed, entrepreneurial communities?

From Coaches (like me) to Personal Trainers, Gardeners to Builders – the working from home concept is not always a viable option.

Let’s be real – Some businesses are ‘hands on’ with the need of physical contact/interaction with others, outside of the home to ‘get the job done’ – now with the ask of social distancing and isolation it has proved that there is a significant impact to such business models.

As someone who has family, friends and a partner, who are in the self-employed world: I have explored, researched and produced as many options and ideas as possible for the self-employed squad to adapt their businesses with the aspiration to generate an income as well as build contacts and create new, enhanced offerings.

I know this is a slight off-brand article. I don’t like to show up empty handed. And if they can help you, then I have fulfilled my mission.

We are incredibly lucky that technology is so easily accessible which allows individuals to turn brands into online content.

Let’s look at the options…

Your occupation is say, a Career Coach, Personal Stylist or Personal Trainer start to think about what services you can transition as an online offerings? What could that look like? How would you make your prices competitive? Can you offer something for free to start to build your network?

Let’s look at some examples:

  • A Personal Trainer could look to schedule virtual classes or 1-2-1 PT sessions allowing their clients to still workout from home!
  • A Life/Career Coach can easily change their face to face 1-2-1 coaching sessions to a Zoom or Skype call which would reduce cancellations.
  • A Personal Stylist could restructure their content to do virtual online shopping experiences. Physical shops might be shut, but online isn’t.

Perhaps you are a retailer that has a physical store or a pop-up shop. Start to think about how you could drive traffic to your website? Do you need to spend more time on creating content? Is it accessible? And most importantly is it user friendly?

And if you don’t have a website, this is your opportunity to create one!

Other avenues to consider are: Creating a clothing subscription model. Start to think about what other additional services you could offer like a wardrobe review which you can do remotely via a Zoom or Skype call. What about creating and offering vouchers for people to use at a later date.

However, what if you are in a job where you need to be outside, “hands-on” and socially interacting with others? Perhaps you don’t have any services to transform or reconstruct into a virtual offering?

This is where changing your mindset is key and is the time for you to apply some flex to your approach and start to adapt your business.

Ok, so you’re a Gardener and your customers have requested that you do not come round as they are self-isolating. Could this now be the time you create how-to videos on planting the perfect bulb to create the perfect garden? Perhaps you wanted to branch out (excuse the pun) to re-brand as a Landscape Gardener, designing, drawing and executing plans. Do you need to up-skill? Are there any courses you could start to educate yourself with? Maybe you can develop a service where potential customers send you photos of their Gardens with measurements and you could send over a few designs then schedule the work virtually by FaceTiming the client when you are onsite?

Perhaps you are a Builder, a Painter and Decorator or perhaps you have job which means you work in yard. Could this be an opportunity to create online content in the form of an online course? Perhaps you have a niche skill that you could train others in?

Maybe, You have the best job in the world (ok, perhaps I’m bias) and you are Dog Walker, Dog Groomer or Dog Socialiser. As more and more people are now working from home, your regular four legged customers are now being walked by their two legged owners. Could this now be the time to modify what you do by creating an online course for new pet owners? Could you write an e-book and sell it on Amazon? Could you do virtual puppy training classes? What about setting up a website, ready to take on new customers once we are back to a level of normality?

Virtual opportunities are there and I hope some of the examples have sparked some ideas on how you could digitalise your business. I don’t want to just leave it there, so I have also provided below your starter tool box, additional tips and law/government resources.

Your toolbox

So you want to start creating content for your socials, your website and perhaps enhance your marketing. Take a look at Canva.

Canva is a graphic design platform that allows and enables you to create social media graphics, presentations, posters and other visual content. It is available on web and on mobile as an app, and integrates millions of images, fonts, templates and illustrations.

So you have all your content. Great. But how do you get it out there. Use Hootsuite – to schedule your posts. It is easy to set up and integrates with all the main social media platforms.

You want to explore your creativity and start to write a book! Great, I have found 3 great websites for you to check out which will help get you started:

You want to create an online course. Plan, Record, Publish! Take a look at the 3 sites I found below which will give you an idea on where to begin.

Conference calls and videoing tools: Zoom and Skype.

Hints, tips and tricks

  • Don’t risk losing your work! Back. it. up! Try using dropbox to keep your work safe! Dropbox is a cloud based filing system for storing docs. Yes, really is as simple as that.
  • Plan, plan, plan. Get yourself a pen and paper to mind map your ideas.
  • Set yourself a timeline, what is realistic?
  • Could you be holding webinars? Perhaps an Insta Live stream. Although you will not make money from this, it will help with establishing your business to a virtual community.
  • What about a community virtual workshop?
  • Build relationships and build your contact base. Don’t be afraid to slide into someone’s DMs as the old saying goes, nothing ventured, nothing gained, you really never know if something could come out of a just a conversation.
  • Also, focus on your community, reconnect with previous clients – is there something you can offer? – The truth is, people are going to remember what you did, what you said and offered for free during this turmoil!
  • Have a think about who could you collaborate with? Who could help you transform your business model?

Government and professional support

Just by googling ‘self-employed benefits covid 19 uk’ I was presented with pages of guidance. Below I have listed out supportive information that is revelant as per date of posting. I recommend checking approved and known sources such as gov.uk and BBC.

Information (updated on 26/03/2020)

Self-employed people will be able to apply for a grant worth 80% of their average monthly profits over the last three years, up to £2,500 a month.

You should be getting a letter/contact from your accountant or the HMRC who can help you further.


Hi, I’m Lucy

I’m here to Career Coach and support you in your next steps of your career journey. I will be your biggest fan, accountability partner and sounding board. We will work together to overcome any limiting beliefs. Tackle the imposter syndrome dragon. Build your career confidence. Learn ways to amplify your voice. Shift your fixed mindset into a growth mindset. In addition, we will cultivate your personal brand.​

I have been in the corporate world for over 10 years. Working in IT, specifically Service Delivery Management; within Retail (head office) and Financial Services. I started my career as a Junior Service Desk Analyst. Then, worked my way to (almost) the top. I have managed strategies, global teams and budgets. I have been the only female in the room. The pink dress, in the ocean of grey suits. Presented to large and global groups, without prior notice.

So, you see, I know what it is like to grow and progress, along with, overcoming obstacles as you build your career. I also know how it feels to aspire to step up to the next level but not also not being too sure on how to put one foot, in front of the other.

Want to work with me on your career? Send me an email: coaching@lucygrimwade.com

The Facts about Imposter Syndrome

The Facts about Imposter Syndrome

Imposter Syndrome, something we are all too familiar with.

Have you ever felt inadequate? Suffered from self-doubt? Feared a question in meeting? Felt like you shouldn’t be in the room? Questioned why you even stepped on the career path you are on?

Then you’re not alone.

Many women (and men) experience the constant, nagging feeling they’re going to be unmasked as a fraud at any minute. Despite overwhelming evidence saying otherwise. It’s a phenomenon that blights most people – and it’s called Imposter Syndrome.

Welcome to Imposter Syndrome – the data

The term Imposter Syndrome came into my vocabulary over the last few years. Perhaps unsurprisingly since I started to progress up the career ladder. I started seeing articles in magazines and recommended reads on Linkedin. Then this year at the Best You Expo, people offering coaching for Imposter Syndrome and most recently a podcast/instagram page called The Imposters Club (find them on insta @theimpostersclub).

Psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes coined the “imposter syndrome” in 1978 when they were studying successful women who believed they were not worthy of their achievements. Their definition:

A feeling of “phoniness in people who believe that they are not intelligent, capable or creative despite evidence of high achievement.” These people also “live in fear of being ‘found out’ or exposed as frauds.”

  • The Independent study  stated it found a third of millennials experience self-doubt at work, with 40% of women saying they felt intimidated by senior people, compared to 22% of men asked.
  • According to HR news ‘Imposter Syndrome has impacted a whopping 62% of people at work, according to a report by Access Commercial Finance. The survey of over 3000 adults in the UK shows over two-thirds of women (66%) have suffered from imposter syndrome compared to over half of men (56%) within the last 12 months’.
  • The Telegraph reported that research showed that 28% of working women feel like imposter syndrome has stopped them speaking in a meeting. It also found 21% have been prevented from suggesting a new or alternative idea at work, and 26% have failed to change career or role.
  • In a WITI article, it stated that research eventually showed a majority of people (70%) will experience imposter syndrome at some point in life, often during transitional times.
  • In 2011, a study published in Human Relations questioned 60,000 full-time workers on their attitudes toward male versus female bosses. 72% of those who expressed a bias towards gender, wanted a male manager. (That was back in 2011!).
Even TRESemmé has a stat! (Via Boots Magazine)

In one of my most recent articles Please mind the (gender pay) gap I explored the well documented topic, of men being paid more than women. I refer to this, because I see a similar pattern. There does not seem to be an equal balance to the feelings towards Imposter Syndrome. With Women showing 10-20% higher results in feeling like a fraud then compared to men. Perhaps Human Relations has a point! Companies are very bias towards one gender, which could be impacting the behaviours and progression of women.

‘It is crucial to remember that women are not born feeling less-than. But if you are continually treated as though you are, you eventually internalise it. And this is not merely a synonym for low confidence – imposter syndrome is the logical outcome of a world that was never designed for women to be successful. It is time we stopped seeing the problem as being women’s refusal to believe in themselves and rather a world that actively refuses to believe in women’. *The Guardian Yomi Adegoke.

With the facts and figures of Imposter Syndrome explored, as a career coach I wanted to provide you with a some useful suggestions to help combat that feeling. That feeling of being a fraud.

6 Imposter Syndrome Hacks

  • Capture all your achievements and remember the positive results. A degree, a career change and/or running a 5K. Whether a photo around your house or on your desktop – make sure they are visible so you can see them.
  • Ask for feedback. Don’t be afraid to either. I like to ask for 360 feedback. It is a process where your manager, your peers and direct reports and sometimes even customers can evaluate you. Ask 3 simple questions – What should I start doing? (This will capture what you need to do) What should I stop doing? (This will give you something to work on) and What should I continue to do? (This is your positive feedback that you can save in your brag list).
  • Remember it is more than OK to ask questions, put your hand up and say ‘I don’t know’ – you are not expected to know everything.
  • Find ways to manage the Imposter Monster when it takes centre stage in your head. When you start hearing ‘You can’t’ find a way to turn that into a ‘CAN’.
  • Find allies both in work and in your friendship circles. When you start using self-doubting language ask your allies to use a code word like ‘pineapple’ 🍍 to bring you back in the room and capture the moment you started to doubt yourself? Perhaps at this point you may want to keep a diary so you can start to build any patterns and recognise any triggers.
  • Listen to podcasts, speak to friends, colleagues and family members about Imposter Syndrome. You will be surprised in how many people are willing to share their stories and you will truly realise you are not alone.

Do you have story of Imposter Syndrome? Have you been in combat with the fear of being found out? Or maybe you have suggestion on improving self doubt. Comment below your thoughts.


Would you like to explore more ways of beating the Imposter Syndrome dragon?

Working with me, as your career coach, we can build successful resilience methods to slay that dragon! I get it, I have encountered so many challenges within my career from lack of support or access to coaching, to bad company cultures with glass ceilings and, of course, the gender pay gap.  All leading, to me, once experiencing and suffering imposter syndrome with self-doubt… Yet have found and grasped opportunities to slay, shine and progress.

Book your free 30 minute Discovery Call with me to find out more:

Contingency planning: A pandemic across the world where companies are now invoking a Work From Home policy

Contingency planning: A pandemic across the world where companies are now invoking a Work From Home policy

As the number of cases rise for the Covid-19/Coronavirus pandemic, companies are being forced to invoke a Work From Home (WFH) policy. Which for some, has not been part of the job agreement. There are questions around capacity of infrastructure systems, costs of supplying laptops and ensuring staff have the right software installed. There are also concerns around employees home set up, their wellbeing and of course trust that your teammate is online, doing the work and of course contactable.

The question really is, what can you do to set yourself and your company up for success whilst doors are closed on the office block during this time of the unknown?

As part of my passion for Culture Creating: I have produced a list of helpful ways you can support your organisation as well as yourself at any level – whether you are an admin, a manager or a CEO you play an integral part to the success of the new ways of working (from home).

WORKING FROM HOME TIPS

(Please take some, if not all of the suggestion points to your leaders or even to friends or community to be part of the success revolution of WFH.)

  • Set up regular morning and if applicable afternoon check-in calls where teams can discuss workload, any concerns and us this as an opportunity to have contact with the outside world.
  • Set up WhatsApp groups, MS Teams team and ensure your line manager has your personal number.
  • Stress test infrastructure capacity and look to temporarily invest in expanding the band width.
  • Look at options of renting laptops, your IT department will have partner contacts like Computacenter or Softcat who could potentially offer packages. (Just ensure you clean them first).
  • For those who have access to machines at home, look to expand your Citrix platform and offer RSA (Remote Acess) Tokens.
Image result for contingency planning pink
Image is from: HERE
  • Create a Team A and Team B and rotate between weeks. This prevents cross contamination as well as reducing the risk of your staff coming into contact with the virus. Make sure you share this plan with all team members, especially senior management!
  • If there is a team member you are concerned about whether it is their mental health or their home situation (suspecting domestic violence), if you are comfortable enough to do so, reach out the them to check in alternatively speak to their line manager and/or HR who can ensure the right action is put in place.
  • Share your WFH and company changes with your suppliers. Let them know how best to contact you. Can they be added to a WhatsApp group? Or in new Teams group?
  • Do you have a Yammer Page? Can you do something on their to promote and share a sense of a positive community?
Lucy, Laptop, Phone, Coffee.
  • Always get up early, don’t be tempted to snooze until 8:55 then log in 9am on the dot. The truth is, in a few months time you need to get back into your routine again so don’t make it harder.
  • Always get dressed!
  • Set up a clear space for yourself to work, have regular screen breaks like you would in the office (like getting a coffee or having lunch) and make sure you have some natural light.
  • Use this as a opportunity to get fit, time will no longer be an excuse – go for that morning run and start to think about how you can add this to your WFH and normal working routine.
  • Drink plenty of water!

It would be great to hear from you. What are you doing as part of a WFH routine? How are you setting up for success? Do you have any suggestions or stories to share? Comment below!

Remember: keep proactive, power your potential and wash your hands for 20 seconds.

It’s a BRAND new world, of personal branding…

It’s a BRAND new world, of personal branding…

But who are you? It is time that you take a lesson from the brands in the public domain, to learn and understand – what it takes to stand out and prosper!

What’s does personal branding mean?

In short, it’s your reputation. Each interaction you have with others has the
opportunity to create a memorable experience, teaching them what they can expect
from you. When you’re consistent in delivering those experiences, you build a strong
reputation. Delivering your brand clearly and consistently across a wide audience
helps open doors to opportunities. Your brand becomes your personal calling card—a
unique promise of value; a distinct and authentic representation of you. In building
your personal brand, you will define your individuality, maximise your strengths and
manage your choices now to create future opportunities.”

Remember: Regardless of age, position, business and title we are all CEO’s of our own companies: Me Inc.

Questions to get you started

  • What are my values?
  • What are my strengths?
  • What are my interests?
  • Why should someone hire me?
  • What are the areas I need to approve on?
  • What object could I use to give a visual to my meaning?
  • What other brands do I like? Why?
  • What brands do I hate? Why?
  • If someone looked at your LinkedIn page, what would they know about you?
  • Does how you dress mirror who you are?

Tools and resources you can use

(Some bullet points are links, so hover over so don’t miss out)

Elevator pitch

The elevator pitch is a brief but persuasive sales speech that you use to spark interest in who you are and what you stand for. In practice, a good elevator pitch should last no longer than a short elevator floor hop which is around 20 to 30 seconds… hence the name.

Using the work you have done with answering the questions set out above, form a few sentences that you can use for an elevator pitch.

Remember:

Image result for elevator pitch female examples
Image is from The Balance Careers

Some examples are:

Melitta Campbell, Business Coach for Female Entrepreneurs, Melitta Campbell.com

I am a business coach for new female entrepreneurs. I offer structured and affordable programs to help them put doubt and anxiety aside, build their entrepreneurial skills and confidence, and create a business they love that delivers the results they desire.

Teri O’Neal, Director of Public Relations, A. Bright Idea

Very few careers offer the opportunity to support chemical weapons demilitarization one minute and vineyard marketing the next. At A. Bright Idea, we do that and more. We offer strategic communications services for industries of all types. What started as one person’s vision, transformed into a full-service, coast-to-coast creative playground. With experts in PR, advertising, graphic design and interactive, A. Bright Idea helps organizations achieve goals.

Bridgett McGowen, Awarded International Professional Speaker, BMcTALKS Academy

My name is Bridgett McGowen, and I am a professional speaker at BMcTALKS. I help professional women who want to speak with power and executive presence but who do not want to waste time reading books and watching videos that cannot give them real and honest feedback on their presentation skills.

You can read more on Fit Small Business.

Comment below your thoughts, ideas and how you transformed your personal branding!

There is more to come on personal branding. To find out more, get in touch with me today!