Doing it all

Doing it all

I get asked at least once a week – ‘how do you do it all?’

And every time I get asked this question, I always stumble on the answer. I start to mutter something along the lines of how I don’t have kids yet, then start making excuses for my success and mention that doing things virtually has made things easier…

Then it hit me, why am I apologising?

I do, do a lot. And I do it darn well. Yes zoom has been a huge enabler, but that isn’t why or even how I do it all.

In this blog post I am going to let you in on how I do it all and how you can too.

Insiders secrets

⚡️ Since reading Robin Sharma’s book – The 5am Club, I have embraced the key learnings. The creative in me designed my own version on elevating my leadership and coaching:

No, I don’t get up at 5am.

And No, I don’t always stick to the rules.

But I do follow the leadership empires. I am huge believer in being self-aware and taking care of myself. For me to be the best for my clients so they can achieve their results, I need to make sure I am healthy, emotionally stable, educated and my inner spirit in nurtured.

⚡️ Who you have in your tribe matters. And gosh, don’t I know it. My partner is incredibly supportive when it comes to my career, ambition and needs. In our household there is no such thing as pink jobs and blue jobs. Just a balance of support, ambition and love.

Someone said to me last week – ‘if you can’t solve a problem with your 5 closest friends, you need to get new ones.’ This is true, over the last 3 to 5 years I have surrounded myself with the right people who I know can help and support me. And, I have parted ways with those who no longer support my growth.

⚡️ I manage my time well: I have a full time job, I coach between 2 to 3 clients a week, I am involved in speaking engagements, I prep/record/edit a podcast, attend or lead networking events, I read lots of books and I write a blog… etc.

How?

I don’t waste time scrolling through Instagram (anymore). I don’t binge watch Netflix. I pre-plan most evening activities e.g. 7pm networking hubs. And, I pick and choose what I do. I no longer feel obligated to attend every single damn networking call. I only attend ones where I can provide value and/or go there with a specific purpose.

Side note: I recommend reviewing this sense of obligation. We are always striving to do more, be more and say more because society is telling us to. But, is that what you want to be doing?

Are you a bad mum because you didn’t bake cookies for the school bake sale? – NO, who doesn’t love M&S buckets?

Are you a bad friend because you rescheduled dinner plans? – Nope.

Are you a bad leader because you didn’t work a 12 hour day? – Hell no, and if you do normally – we need to talk.

➡️ When I start to feel overwhelmed or burnout creeping in (because I have worked on my triggers and I know what to look out for) … I take a break, go for a massage or a walk or journal.

Why I do it all

Someone asked this week – ‘What is your why?’ And wow, what a questions.

The reason I work so hard is because I want to empower, encourage and grow other people. I want to enable others to be the best of versions of themselves. Because I know we all have the potential to be in that top 5% of leadership and the human race.

Oh and whilst I am on the subject of leadership, I am still on a mission to change the face of it.

So my why: Empower and enable others to progress whilst changing the face of leadership.

When I asked the question back, I was blown away with her response: ‘Everyone is welcomed at my table.’ Backed up with a strong story of female empowerment.

Now over to you

We have all seen that saying: ‘You have the same amount of hours as Beyoncé’

I have the same amount of hours in the day as Oprah. And, hell yes I make them count.

What will you start to do with your hours in the day?

Change is more than just a word.

Change is more than just a word.

Last year, became a year of change. From new routines, altered shopping habits and different ways of socialising. We were all forced to embrace change and still continue to ride a change wave in 2021…

In this article, I explore how change can impact organisations, people and provide knowledge to those who are interested in this subject or are going through an organisational change or even a career change.

What is change?

In simple terms, change is to make or become different. Or replace/exchange something. Change is the situation such as to move house, to wear something different or to do a different job. It is about doing things differently, seeing things in a new way, as well as adjusting and adapting to ideas.

There key factors to take into consideration when it comes to change are:

  • Change affects everyone differently; there is no “normal.”
  • Change is an essential element of the world and it must be accepted. (Even a Pandemic World type-of-change)
  • Adapting to change is about the attitudes we have.
  • We have to grieve for what we are letting go of.
  • Change is an opportunity for self-motivation and innovation.
  • We can identify strategies for accepting and implementing our changes

How does change impact organisations and its people?

When applying change to an organisation, a quote from William Bridges springs to mind: ‘It isn’t the change that do you in. It’s the transition’

Let’s look at a really simple example to explain change to an organisation: Change is a new mobile phone (say from basic phone to a smartphone). Transition is learning how to use it.

With the new smartphone, you will be excited by the newness, the style, things you can do, the apps and pictures as well as the productivity.

However you are also a little anxious and uncertain – what if you don’t know how to use it properly? What if all your contacts are not there? What if I download the wrong app?

It is about addressing how that change will affect you. When applying change at an organisation, like the new mobile phone example, it is about covering all bases and knowing whatever the change you put in place, you will need a transition period to ensure maximum results.

Three phases of the change

There are three phases, which was established by William Bridges who believes, that changes isn’t necessarily the problem; the change is the situation. People have difficulty with the transition.

The transition isn’t optional and we must all go through the three stages to accommodate ourselves to any change:

Endings

All change begins with an ending. This first phase of change transition begins when people identify what they are losing something and then to learn how to manage these losses. They determine what is over and being left behind, and what they will keep. These may include relationships, processes, team members or locations.

What do you need let go of? What will you be keeping?

Neutral Zone

This is a time to complete endings and begin new patterns. The second step comes after letting go: the neutral zone. People go through an in-between time when the old is gone but the new isn’t fully operational. It is a time to support others. It is the very core of the change transition process. This is the time between the old reality and sense of identity and the new one. People are creating new processes and learning what the new roles will be, but it’s in a state of change and doesn’t feel comfortable yet. To perhaps plant the seed for the new beginning.

What new habits or processes are you putting into place?

Beginnings

It has been said that organisations think about beginnings long before people do. There is often conflict between the companies motivation and the critical mass/ people to make it happen, so it is essential to get people involved, especially those who are leaders and can of course influence. At this stage, Beginnings involve new understandings, new values and attitudes. Beginnings are marked by a release of energy in a new direction – they are an expression of a fresh identity. Well-managed transition allows people to establish in new roles with an understanding of their purpose, the part they play, and how to contribute and participate most effectively. They are reoriented and renewed.

How is your new beginning better than before?

Let’s look at the Change curve model

The Kubler-Ross Change Curve, something you have probably seen before. It is used across businesses globally showing the 5 stages of emotional response to change, which are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. This model was introduced by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross in a book called ‘Death and Dying’ – After publication the model was widely accepted and it was found that it was valid in a majority of cases and situations relating to change.

Where Are You On The Change Curve? - Growing Organisations Ltd

What it means

In the times we live in right now this change curve seems more than applicable. The entire world are on it and at different points on any given day.

Here is an example of how we are all currently going through the change curve:

  • Shock – “OMG, Are we really living through a global pandemic??”
  • Denial – “We will back in the office in no-time”
  • Frustration – “I am so over lockdowns. I want to go back into work. I want to go out and socialise.”
  • Depression – “I’m so upset, I just want to be back at work, I am so stressed there is so much to do and my company have invoked a recruitment freeze, so I can’t get support for my team.”
  • Experiment – “Working from home is still happening for the foreseeable future, let’s think about what’s not working and try out new approaches. Instead of working on the sofa, I will buy a desk and set up a mini office in my spare room.”
  • Decision – “With my new desk and attitude, I got a lot more done today!”
  • Integration – “After lockdown I may now even ask to work from home more often!”

Does any of this resonate with you? Where are you in the change curve?

Did you know that you could be on one change curve or several. Here are the most common changes we are experiencing:

  • Remote working
  • Home schooling
  • Job insecurity
  • Furlough
  • Financial insecurity 
  • Role change 

Feelings of shock, denial, and frustration are all natural responses as we seek to resist change. This is normal since change means loss. But as we begin to acknowledge what we have lost and begin to feel sadness or depression about it we are then moving closer to acceptance.

What next?

Well that is up to you. If you are going through change now or the next time you go through change both personally and professionally, here is an exercise that you can use to help understand where you are and support yourself on the journey:

  1. Write out your change “problem” statement.
  2. Draw your curve(s) and ask yourself , where am I on the curve right now?
  3. Ask yourself, the 5 whys around your feelings (there is no wrong answer).
  4. Next, think about support: who can I talk to about where I am on it?
  5. When you are ready, start to put steps in place to help you move along your change curve.

For time and the world do not stand still. Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future. – JFK

Did you enjoy this article? Would you like to have a virtual coffee? – click here or get in touch here

Train your brain to work for you.

Train your brain to work for you.

Our brains are incredibly powerful. As we go through life we have experiences, life events and other people’s influences that have all fed into our subconscious mind. Our current behaviours have been modeled on what we saw growing up:

  • 0 to 7 years is where we imprint
  • 7 to 14 years is when model our behaviours
  • 14 to 21 is where we learn our socialisation skills are developed

Moreover, with all this mind… Our brains then use deletion, distortion and generalisation to either fight, flight or freeze (behaviours). Which sometimes protects us, but can often hinder us.

Brain training – NLP

  • N = Neuro is the physical components as well as the mental and emotional components of our neurology.
  • L = Linguistic is the language that we use, and more specifically, how we communicate with others and ourselves.
  • P = Programming is the way our past experiences, thoughts and emotions affect all areas of our lives.

Cause & effect: Putting your focus more on the “How” in place of “why” is the basic goal of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). It’s very practical with the aim of training you to be in charge of your own mind, the way you think, your views towards past and present events, and mostly your approach towards life.

Brain Training – CBT

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help you manage your mindset by changing the way you think and behave. CBT is based on the concept that your thoughts, feelings, physical sensations and actions are interconnected, and that negative thoughts and feelings can trap you in a vicious cycle.

Leaves on a stream:

(1) Sit in a comfortable position and either close your eyes or rest them gently on a fixed spot in the room.

(2) Visualize yourself sitting beside a gently flowing stream with leaves floating along the surface of the water. Pause 10 seconds.

(3) For the next few minutes, take each thought that enters your mind and place it on a leaf… let it float by.  Do this with each thought – pleasurable, painful, or neutral.  Even if you have joyous or enthusiastic thoughts, place them on a leaf and let them float by.

(4) If your thoughts momentarily stop, continue to watch the stream.  Sooner or later, your thoughts will start up again.  Pause 20 seconds.

(5) Allow the stream to flow at its own pace.  Don’t try to speed it up and rush your thoughts along.  You’re not trying to rush the leaves along. You are allowing them to come and go at their own pace.

(6) If your mind says “This is dumb,” “I’m bored,” or “I’m not doing this right” place those thoughts on leaves, too, and let them pass.  Pause 20 seconds.

(7) If a leaf gets stuck, allow it to hang around until it’s ready to float by.  If the thought comes up again, watch it float by another time.  Pause 20 seconds.

(8) If a difficult or painful feeling arises, simply acknowledge it.  Say to yourself, “I notice myself having a feeling of boredom/impatience/frustration.”  Place those thoughts on leaves and allow them float along.

(9) From time to time, your thoughts may hook you and distract you from being fully present in this exercise. This is normal.  As soon as you realize that you have become sidetracked, gently bring your attention back to the visualization exercise.


Coaching that works around you

As a Professional Development Coach, I am qualified and experienced in two neuroscience-based and therapeutic coaching techniques: Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT).

This is in addition to my knowledge and experience with more traditional coaching practices as a Certified Professional Coach. Together these provide the tools to gain deep insight and understanding of your mindset and the way you think and show up in the world.  You will easily be able to apply all the techniques we work on, in your day to day life. 

To find out more, book your virtual coffee with me: HERE

The Coaching Industry

The Coaching Industry

The demand in the coaching industry has grown in recent years and continues to do so. With the recent stir The Guardian article “Online job coaches ‘are exploiting the unemployed during pandemic’” has caused, it has made me think more about the coaching industry.

The coaching industry is not yet regulated.

Which, unlike other helping professions such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) regulates nurses, midwives and nursing associates. And The UKCP is the leading professional body for the education, training, accreditation and regulation of psychotherapists and psychotherapeutic counsellors.

A regulatory body is responsible for formulating and enforcing laws that protect the safety of patients/clients and set basic quality standards.

The coaching industry, in a way does have a regulation (of sorts) via International Coaching Federation (ICF). After 25 years, the ICF has evolved to become the hub for all things coaching. They are a membership organisation for trained professional coaches. And are seen as the gold-standard in the industry.

In addition, there is also EMCC and AC.

Yet, there is still a way to go.

Why is it a problem?

Many people call themselves coaches. Yet, some have never been trained by a credentialed coach and course.

This is a concern.

Because

a) Due to the lack of regulation the quality of coaching will vary. This also means, the results will vary too.

b) In addition, as we have seen in The Guardian article, the lack of regulation is now giving the coaching profession a bad name as well as a poor reputation.

c) What is MOST alarming is exploitation of clients. Charging clients ridiculous amounts of money for uneducated coaching which doesn’t give sustainable results.

However, coaching is transformational & crucial to development.

The ICF defines coaching as ‘partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.’

Moreover, Coaching is a conversation. What makes the conversation different is the impact it has on the person being coached. An effective coaching session challenges, guides and encourages. And aids client understanding, learning, behaviour and progression.

Coaching is:⠀

  • Working collaboratively at the same pace.
  • Conversations with purpose.⠀
  • Breaking new ground which can be challenging yet encourages a deeper conversation (& outcome). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Coaching can:⠀

  • Go deep.
  • Identify possibilities.
  • Change the way you think (e.g. remove limiting beliefs that could be holding you back). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Coaching is not: Mentoring, Counselling, Training, Management and Consulting. These are very different things.

When looking for a coach, here is what you need to know.

Be prepared to interview a number of professional coaches. Review their background and experience. Check out their qualifications. A good starting point is to identify whether the coach has been accredited by the International Coaching Federation (ICF), EMCC or AC.

In addition to this, don’t be shy in asking for testimonials. Reviewing their LinkedIn pages and checking out other social media profiles like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. You can also ask to see proof of insurance and even look them up on Companies House.

If you can’t afford the programme or feel you are being pressured into signing up – the coach isn’t for you.

Furthermore, when looking for a coach, use this checklist:

  1. Qualifications.
  2. Testimonial.
  3. Affordability.
  4. Insurance.
  5. Authentic Social Media Presence.

I am currently undertaking a Professional Coaching Diploma with Full Circle Global. Specialising in Career Development, Full Circle Global are approved by the International Coaching Federation (ICF) as a training provider.

With this qualification, I became a member of the ICF Gold Standard Coaching Body, where I am working towards gaining ACC level accreditation.

In addition, I also have a Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) Practitioner & Coaching qualification accredited by NLP Association of Excellence. Additionally, I have a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) diploma which was awarded by Renaissance Therapy.

Find out more about me HERE

Investing in coaching, things you need to know

Investing in coaching, things you need to know

Have you ever wondered what coaching is all about?

The demand for coaching has grown in recent years and continues to do so. To start with, I want to ask you a question – What is your understanding of coaching?

The ICF (International Coaching Federation) defines coaching as ‘partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.’

Thus, coaching is a conversation, or a series of conversations, that one person has with another. What makes the conversation different is the impact the conversation has on the person being coached. An effective coaching conversation challenges, guides and encourages someone’s understanding, learning, behaviour and progression.

Coaching is:⠀

  • Working collaboratively at the same pace.
  • Conversations with purpose.⠀
  • Breaking new ground which can be challenging yet encourages a deeper conversation (& outcome).

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Coaching can:⠀

  • Go deep.
  • Identify possibilities.
  • Change the way you think (e.g. remove limiting beliefs that could be holding you back). ⠀⠀

Coaches are great in identifying when a client can be shying away from the wider picture and pointing out (with the client’s permission) any limiting beliefs that may be keeping them back from achieving what they want. A good coach will push individuals to the limits and will help them grow and get what they really want out of their life as a whole.

As an individual, you may work really hard in your life, however at some point we all hit certain walls and have blind spots. A good coach can help you recognise and address them.

Unfortunately, the coaching industry is not as regulated as other “helping” professions such as, therapy and NHS Mental Health related support. Many people call themselves coaches but they have no idea what coaching is and some have never been trained by a credentialed coach and course. This can be problematic, as due to the lack of such regulation, the quality of coaches will vary as well as give the coaching profession a bad name and reputation.

So, when looking for a coach, be prepared to interview a number of professionals, review their background and experience, and check out their qualifications. A good starting point is to identify whether the coach has been accredited by the International Coaching Federation (ICF). Don’t be shy in asking for testimonials, reviewing their LinkedIn pages and checking out other social media profiles like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. You can also ask to see proof of insurance and even look them up on Companies House.

While the coach is not your colleague, friend or mentor, they will support and help you to succeed and reach your desired goal. The right coach will hold you accountable and challenge you in ways that may feel uncomfortable at times. However, with their support you can grow, learn and succeed. An experience coach will never tell you what to do or even offer advice. Instead, the role of the coach will help you identify your options and come up with the best choices based on the goals you want to achieve.

Coaching is about using the right type of questions. Questions hold the power to cause us to think, create answers from ourselves, that we believe in and act on our ideas. Asking questions moves us beyond passive acceptance of what others say and do. Questions honour you as a person and communicate your values as an equal.

It is important to note, that coaching is confidential, safe and is proven to work.

Do you ever find yourself thinking: “there’s got to be more to life than this” or “I’ve tried everything to make my career a success, but nothing’s working” or “there’s something holding me back and I don’t know what it is,” – Does any of this sound familiar?

Perhaps you feel a little overwhelmed, from having too many options as to what to do next, or mastered the art of procrastination, not knowing how to get started or you may lack the confidence to take action to achieve your dreams. This tends to happen when there is a misalignment between what you want at the conscious level and the unconscious patterns, beliefs, behaviours, habits and programs that are running in the background.

On the surface, you are saying “I want to do THIS” but underneath, the unconscious mind is doing everything in its power to prevent the “this” from happening.

Mindset coaching will help uncover the beliefs, blocks, behaviours, habits and patterns of thinking that is preventing you from living the life or creating the career you desire.

As a Career & Mindset Coach I am qualified and experience in two neuroscience-based and therapeutic techniques: Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT).

This is in addition to my knowledge and experience with more traditional coaching practices as a certified Professional Coach. All this together, are the tools to gain deep insight and understanding of your mindset and the way you think and show up in the world. All techniques that we work on together, you will easily be able to apply in your day to day as they are designed to shift perception, change minds and therefore change lives.

The Career & Mindset Coaching programmes are designed around you. They are accessible, flexible and affordable. I’ve made sure of that.

Career & Mindset Coaching with me provides you with the dedicated time, space and effort to sit with a ‘neutral’ someone and your aspirations, analysing and working together to really define your Career & Mindset steps and creating an action plan to help you achieve them.

Clients have gained direction, focus, and confidence from working with me, leaving them less overwhelmed and confused about the future of their career. By exploring your values, personality, drivers and strengths, you can move forward with your career armed with tools and techniques to continue to thrive.

The starting fees, take into account my breath of knowledge and experience, coaching qualifications as well as the incredible value and life-long benefits that coaching provides. Coaching sessions are not a quick fix but an investment of time, commitment, energy, and accountability towards your future, and how it turns out.

  • First coaching session can be up to 2 hours
  • Remaining sessions are between 1 hour to 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Each session is tailored around you
  • Sessions can be via phone call, video call or face to face

Signing up to Career & Mindset Coaching with me is your first step in taking charge of your future, and carving out a happy, fulfilling, and successful career and mindset. You’ve got this!

What is coaching?

What is coaching?

Have you ever wondered what coaching is all about?

The demand for coaching has grown in recent years and continues to do so. To start with, I want to ask you a question – What is your understanding of coaching?

The ICF defines coaching as ‘partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.’

Thus, coaching is a conversation, or a series of conversations, that one person has with another. What makes the conversation different is the impact the conversation has on the person being coached. An effective coaching conversation challenges, guides and encourages someone’s understanding, learning, behaviour and progression.

Coaching is:⠀

  • Working collaboratively at the same pace.
  • Conversations with purpose.⠀
  • Breaking new ground which can be challenging yet encourages a deeper conversation (& outcome). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Coaching can:⠀

  • Go deep.
  • Identify possibilities.
  • Change the way you think (e.g. remove limiting beliefs that could be holding you back). ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Coaching is not: Mentoring, Counselling, Training, Management and Consulting. These are very different things.

“Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.”

Albert Einstein

These words can hold some importance, especially for those of us who currently feel a bit stuck, need a new approach, a change in direction, find a purpose, or are not getting the results they want. When faced with such situations, working with a coach can help clients make significant changes in their life, and start to achieve the results they desire.

Coaches are great in identifying when a client can be shying away from the wider picture and pointing out (with the client’s permission) any limiting beliefs that may be keeping them back from achieving what they want. A good coach will push individuals to the limits and will help them grow and get what they really want out of their life as a whole.

As an individual, you may work really hard in your life, however at some point we all hit certain walls and have blind spots. A good coach can help you recognise and address them.

Unfortunately, the coaching industry is not as regulated as other “helping” professions such as, therapy and NHS Mental Health related support. Many people call themselves coaches but they have no idea what coaching is and some have never been trained by a credentialed coach and course. This can be problematic, as due to the lack of such regulation, the quality of coaches will vary as well as give the coaching profession a bad name and reputation.

 So, when looking for a coach, be prepared to interview a number of professionals, review their background and experience, and check out their qualifications. A good starting point is to identify whether the coach has been accredited by the International Coaching Federation (ICF). Don’t be shy in asking for testimonials, reviewing their LinkedIn pages and checking out other social media profiles like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. You can also ask to see proof of insurance and even look them up on Companies House.

While the coach is not your colleague, friend or mentor, they will support and help you to succeed and reach your desired goal. The right coach will hold you accountable and challenge you in ways that may feel uncomfortable at times. However, with their support you can grow, learn and succeed. An experience coach will never tell you what to do or even offer advice. Instead, the role of the coach will help you identify your options and come up with the best choices based on the goals you want to achieve.

Coaching is about using the right type of questions. Questions hold the power to cause us to think, create answers from ourselves, that we believe in and act on our ideas. Asking questions moves us beyond passive acceptance of what others say and do. Questions honour you as a person and communicate your values as an equal.

It is important to note, that coaching is confidential, safe and is proven to work.

I will end this piece, with how I started. By asking you a question – (and now you know about coaching…) What would you do, if you knew you couldn’t fail? What would you try to achieve?

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Would you like to find our more about coaching? Maybe a little bit about me? Or perhaps you are just intrigued. You can schedule a virtual coffee with me or visit my website www.lucygrimwade.com

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